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Frederick White and Ruth Glass – Marjorie and John White’s Parents

Frederick John Scroxton White was born on January 14, 1885, at #49 Clave (or Clare) Street in Northampton, England; during the time when the sun never sat on the English Empire. Before Cicely was born in 1887, the family moved to #1 Northcote Street. His family converted to the LDS faith, and his parents were baptized on March 16, 1888, by Elder Thomas Ezra Wrighton. They departed for New York City on April 28, 1888; their ship was the S. S. Wisconsin and arrived on May 16th. They travel by train to Salt Lake. After living with Richard and Ellen Holton, his mother’s cousins, they moved three times. In August 1890, Fred’s father purchased a home at 225 Iowa. In February of 1893, Fred was baptized by Elder Williams, and later confirmed a member by Joseph H. Felt. In 1894, Fred was sealed in the Salt Lake Temple to his parents. 1

As a child, Fred was a real boy; he delighted in teasing and playing pranks—not just on Halloween. 1 As a teenager, he took a neighbors' buggy apart and reassembled it on top of the neighbors' barn; the neighbor was willing to forgive Fred on the condition that Fred explain how he was able to do it. On Halloween, he enjoyed turning over out-houses that were behind neighbors’ homes. In the summer, he enjoyed roaming the hills of the Wasatch Front.2 Additionally, his sisters were perfect for teasing. He was mechanically minded often disassembling and reassembling bicycles. Many a time he walked to the spring to bring water home for the family’s use. 1

Fred liked, and was good to, old people, among who was Adam Croutch, who passed their home twice a day with hoops on his shoulders, which he picked up from the barrels at the brewery on 10th East between 3rd and 4th South, where he worked. These he gave to any child who might ask for them. Years went by, but Fred always stopped him on the street and put money in his hand. Another such person was “Crazy Miller”, as he was referred to. Fred and the boys would gather at his humble home, which was very conspicuous, to hear his stories and eat the candy which he had brought for them. This man had an unfortunate love affair, which affected his mind. He kept a light burning in the window for the bride who never came. He was a plasterer. He always wore a high silk hat, and swallow tails under his apron, while working, and slept in his coffin. Fred had a mental list of persons whom he helped when he was old enough to earn money. 1

Fred and the neighborhood boys formed a club, which was just over the fence in a dugout rudely constructed from old boards. This, together with a drum which he didn’t know how to play, annoyed a nervous neighbor whose husband left notice at the door, telling Fred to go to the hills or elsewhere if he must play. Neither the club nor the drums lasted long. How different Fred’s sounds were to Cousin Ellen Holton who idolized Fred. He was drumming on the piano which Cicely was buying (as he did every time he could get to it) on a day Ellen was visiting. Though he couldn’t play, and was making an awful noise, she said, “Sarah, let the dear boy play, it sounds good!” 1

While Sarah Ann had the patience of an angel, Fred’s Sunday school teacher was not as patient. Fred had thrown spit balls and had whittled his name in a church bench. The teacher took Fred to the stand and made him sit there, facing the audience. This so humiliated Fred that he could not be persuaded to attend Sunday School. This act not only affected the religious life of a boy, but the teacher lost the love and respect of the Ward members. 1

Many happy days were spent in the country, but it wasn’t all fun. In Perry, Fred helped Uncle John with the chores, with the cattle and the hay, sleeping in the log cabin, which consisted of five rooms with only one inside door that led into Aunt Jene’s room from the dining room. After the cabin was torn down, he slept at Uncle John’s home, up the lane. Other times, he spent part of the summer with Uncle Fred in Brigham City. Uncle Fred didn’t have a farm; he was an attorney, but his home was surrounded by fruit trees, vegetables, lawn, flowers, current bushed, nut trees, two arbors covered with two kinds of grapes which they ate as they swung in the hammock, as well as a barn with a few animals, all of which made it an interesting place. He also had a surrey and took Fred fishing, as did Uncle John. At Uncle Fred’s, Fred also had to make himself useful. 1


Fred liked to roller skate in the auditorium at Richards Street and to see and hear the “Great Ferdon, the Medicine Man, who entertained in a large tent. To this tent he took Grace quite often when acting as a baby sitter, while mother and his other two sisters went to the theater. 1

The family celebrated birthdays with cakes, and Christmas with large dinners that always included Yorkshire pudding. On New Year’s Day, the family would always gather together to sing “God Save the Queen”.2

Ruth Glass

Ruth Glass was born on March 17, 1893, in Salt Lake City; Utah was still a territory, not becoming a state until 1896. She was born on St Patrick’s Day and loved her Irish ancestry. Ruth was very proud of Utah and her pioneer heritage. Her sister, Laura (Lol) Mae Glass, was born on August 11, 1899, in Salt Lake City. Ruth was loving and protective of her little sister. She would hurry home each day to take Lol to school, since Lol felt she needed assistance. 3

Because her father sought employment opportunities in Chicago, Ruth attended First Grade in Chicago. Upon returning to Utah, she attended the Wasatch School and the Lowell School. Ruth loved school and was excited by the wonders of the world. Ruth felt insecure after her parents’ divorce. Her grandmother constantly reminded her of the burden Samuel had placed on her, leaving the family without sustenance. The little girl needed love and not the constant reminder of her father's imperfections. Ruth was taught house work and worked hard, as there were many tasks to complete in those days. She cleaned the kerosene lamps, cleaned the outside bathroom, beat rugs, washed clothing by hand on a scrubbing board, and did other chores that were required of her. She performed the tasks well; she had been well trained by her mother and grandmother Emma. 3 Emma was not always happy with the responsibility of helping Ruth, complaining to Ruth about wearing out the carpets, and the mess her father had left them in. Ruth’s childhood was difficult. 2

Eliza Jane was finally able to have her own little home for Ruth and Lol. Eliza worked as a seamstress and made many beautiful hats and blouses. Ruth continued to help her mother in the care of their humble home and of her sister Lol. After Eliza had a long day at work, Ruth would have dinner ready. Ruth would often stay with her aunts, and she should assist them in caring for their children. Ruth had a great love for her aunts, each one, dear to her in a special way. Ruth enjoyed her cousins and felt close to them. Ruth showed a great amount of outwardly love for her family; in stark contrast to her mother and grandmother's sternness and bitterness.3

Now grown up, Ruth stopped her education and did not finish high school; at this time, it was common not to complete high school. Ruth decided to obtain employment at Cohn's Department Store where she worked in the dress pattern department. It was here that she met co-worker, Frederick White, who she was soon to marry. Ruth had become a beautiful, dark haired girl with lovely brown eyes. In 1909, Fred found employment as a display manager at Wright's Department Store in Ogden. He decided to marry Ruth. Fred took a gold piece to the jeweler who made it into a ring. On April 19, 1909, they eloped and were married by a justice of the peace in Ogden, Utah. Fred rented a surrey, horse and buggy, and traveled to Brigham City, Utah on their honeymoon, staying with Fred's Uncle John who lived in Perry, Utah. 3 The family in Salt Lake did not know that they were married until Ruth called her mother that afternoon. That night, Eliza Glass and Fred Penfold, who where married the next year, came to the John White’s home to discuss the matter, inasmuch as Ruth was sixteen years old. Fred was eight years older. Tears turned into smiles. John White, Fred’s father, said, “If her name is Ruth, I know I, for one, am going to love her because she has my favorite sister’s name.” 1

After a few days, the newlyweds returned to Ogden where they resided. Unfortunately, Fred and Ruth lost their wedding certificate, and the justice of the peace had failed to record the wedding with Weber County. Upon retirement and in order to take advantage of Social Security and Medicare, Fred and Ruth were required to provide proof of marriage. On August 29, 1950, Ruth and Fred were again married by a district judge in Reno, Nevada on the way to visit Lol in California. 3

When Fred's father, John White, became ill in the early autumn, passing away October 1910, Fred made the decision to move back to Salt Lake City to be near his mother. He found employment with Auerbach’s, a large department store competing with ZCMI. They lived with Grandmother White (Sarah Ann) for a short time. On July 19, 1910, they were blessed with a beautiful boy, John Frederick White. John was born at Grandmother Eliza Jane's home. For a time it was feared that both mother and son would die. As a result of birth injuries, he was born deaf. The doctor for a time feared he would loose both Ruth and the baby, but fortunately both were spared. On December 5, 1914, Ruth Helen White, a beautiful baby, was born but died on January 14, 1915, her father's birthday. Great sadness was experienced with her passing, their first daughter. On July 2, 1916, a very healthy baby was born; they named her Marjorie June. This fat cheeked little baby looked to them as if she were here to stay. Lol lived just a few doors west, so she took great delight in helping Ruth care for Marjorie. As a teenager and in later life, Lol’s nickname for Marjorie was Betty. 3

Ruth and Fred took their son to ear doctors, hoping he might receive help with his hearing problem. It was finally decided that Jack should attend the Deaf School in Ogden. He was a bright young child, and they wanted what was best for him and his future. Ruth and Fred were sorrowful that Jack was to leave, but recognized the importance of his education. Jack would come home once a month, and Eliza Jane would drive her car to the Bamberger Station on West South Temple and help Ruth welcome him home. As loving parents, Ruth and Fred would drive to Ogden to visit Jack on Sundays and take him out for a ride and dinner. Each May, Jack would return for summer vacation to Salt Lake City. He learned to be very self reliant at school and was active in sports. 3

Ruth and Fred found great joy in their family association with Cicely, Florence, Grace, and Ralph Cracroft. One summer week was spent with the Cracrofts at Vivian Park on the Provo River outside Provo, Utah. Ruth and Fred enjoyed the mountains and frequent family picnic lunches. Autumns were always a time Fred enjoyed driving up American Fork Canyon to delight in the beauty of the autumn colors. Fred loved to tease his sisters and would always find a steep mountain road that would scare his sister Cicely. She would say, "Fred stop the car and let me walk." The Alpine Loop Road was the most terrifying to her. Grandmother Sarah Ann would always have the greatest confidence in her son's driving ability and remained in the car. 3

Depression years in the 1930's brought hardships on many families. Fred was display manager for Auerbach’s on Third South and State; Auerbach’s was the largest and most elaborate department store in Utah. In 1934, he was released from his job due to a cut in department heads. He searched many months for employment and found nothing. He then made the decision to start his own commercial art business. Fred had a difficult time controlling Ruth’s spending habits, especially during the Great Depression. He remained in that business until the on set of Word War II, and then found employment with Roes Department Store. The family had been living at 1140 Herbert Avenue; Fred had grown tired of home and lawn care so they moved to the Ivanhoe Apartments in 1935 and lastly to the Elaine Apartments, both on Third South between Fourth and Fifth East. Fred enjoyed cigars which caused his daughter Marjorie to get serious headaches.

Paul Cracroft, a nephew, remembers stopping by and watching Fred work at Auerbach’s. The windows were among the most striking department store windows in town and bore Fred’s artistry and personality. Fred would finger waive his nephews and nieces into the store, reward them with a wink, an ubiquitous smile, and an equally ubiquitous half-dollar. Paul remembers Uncle Fred’s ever-present cigar, and the family’s strong love for Fred. Fred drew from a treasure trove of stories, some of them fit for childish ears. He never failed to get a laugh from Ralph Cracroft, Paul’s dad, or occasional dark look from his sister Grace, Paul’s mother.4

The war brought about gasoline and tire rationing along with food and shoe rationing, so Fred sold his last car, a Pontiac Sedan. Ruth and Fred enjoyed walking and continued to enjoy this pastime for many years. 3

Ruth worked at Hughes Dress Shop and The Maternity Shop, selling wearing apparel. Fred retired in 1955, and Ruth retired shortly thereafter. They found pleasure in being with the family. Fred enjoyed reading good books and always had time for his daily walk. Fred would put on his hat and suit; Ruth would put on her black dress, jewelry, hat and gloves; and they would go for a stroll on Broadway (300 South) and up Main. Fred would enjoy a good smoke along the way since Ruth no longer allowed Fred to smoke in the house. They took various trips with Fred’s sisters to New York City, New England States, Canada, Southern Utah and the Northwest. Cliff Cracroft took the family on many trips; he was Ralph Cracroft's younger brother and Grace’s brother-in-law. Ruth was thrilled with nature and would often talk of her love of nature and its beauty. 3

Richard Thomsen remembered visits to Ruth and Fred meant a climb up to the third floor of the Elaine Apartments on 300 South. On the fight up the stairs, old cigar smoke could be smelt. Upon opening the door, Ruth provided a strong hug and a big kiss, including lip stick on the cheek. Fred would welcome you with a twinkle in his eye; that twinkle often meant trouble for Ruth. Ruth, while normally upbeat, had little if any humor; this gave Fred great opportunities for teasing. After a round of teasing, Ruth were blurt out, “Eh Gads Fred.” He often called Ruth “Diamond Lil”; Ruth had a fondness for elaborate jewelry, enjoyed a new hat, and normally wore a black dress. Visits with grandchildren often included a walk to the ice cream store. Family visits included checkers and hearts played around the dining room table. Food was normally fried chicken or chops, mashed potatoes, and a green salad. Ruth was an expert “salt and pepper” cook. The fried chicken was the best ever smelt under heaven. Dinners normally ended with strawberry ice cream. Less formal dinners would be served on little tables called TV tables in front of the television in the living room. Ruth cooked simple foods and did not use recipes, thus none survived. Due to steam heat in the apartment and after preparing a large meal, Ruth would be hot, show exasperation over the heat, and would swing the windows open in the winter for a breath of cool air. On frequently enjoyed car rides around the Wasatch Front, Ruth would need the car window opened a crack. Since Fred did not like gravy, Ruth often called him a “dry old Englishman.” Ruth had nervous energy and seemed to be ever talking. Just before leaving, Fred gave a half-dollar to the grandchildren.2

Fred became ill in 1963 and was in declining health for five years. It was difficult to see this happy humorous man fail in health and memory. He died on October 7, 1968, in his home. He died with his green card (a copy is attached), remaining a loyal citizen to the crown. The savings account for retirement was now gone so the family helped Ruth with her rent. Ruth died on August 22, 1981, in a rest home in Salt Lake City, after suffering several years from dementia. Ruth and Fred's greatest love of life was their family. Ruth's kisses and hugs and the twinkle in Fred’s eyes are remembered by her grandchildren. 3

The world had changed in their lifetime. Two world wars and a serious depression had struck Utah very hard. During their lifetime, Fred and Ruth saw for the first time electric lights, automobiles, paved streets, immunizations, phones, radios, airplanes, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions, and space flight. With all these changes, the love of their family had remained steadfast.2


Sources:
1. History written by Florence White
2. Memories written by Richard Thomsen
3. History written by Marjorie June White Thomsen
4. Memories written by Paul Cracroft, nephew




Memories of Grandpa Fred and Grandma Ruth


As a young boy, I have fond memories of visiting my grandparents. I can remember walking up the steps to their apartment and could tell by the aroma we were going to have one of Grandma Ruth's wonderful ham dinners with all the fixins. Grandpa Fred always made us feel welcome. I enjoyed his sense of humor and teasing. I never saw Grandpa Fred smoke, but I would see his pipe and recognized the familiar scent of his pipe tobacco. I never could beat Grandpa Fred at checkers or Chinese checkers. I would play with intensity as I tried to plan ahead his possible moves. He was always a move or two ahead and encouraged me to keep playing. Grandpa made our visits entertaining, and I marveled at his art work and would ask him to draw me pictures of cars and trains. I remember when it was time to leave, we would say our goodbyes, and Grandpa would call me back up to him and he would place quarters in my hand and tell me to get an ice cream.

Grandma and Grandpa were always dressed up. I wondered if they ever wore Levis and casual attire. Grandpa Fred would wear a suit and tie and hat, and Grandma Ruth would wear a very nice dress, hat and gloves, and they would go downtown to shop or to sit and watch people. I will never forget Grandpa Fred's comment one time when he saw a hippie walking down the street by Auerbach's in the 60's, and he said, "Ruth, Ruth look at that one!"

I remember both Grandma and Grandpa were hard workers. I remember visiting Grandma at work at a clothing store, and she looked so beautiful and sophisticated. Grandpa was a commercial artist, and I can remember he worked at Auerbach's. On one occasion, I told Grandpa that I was taking a woodshop class and enjoyed making projects for my parents. He asked if I knew how to work a jig saw, and I told him I did. He asked me and my Dad to go with him to a storage area in the apartment complex. I remember walking there and wondered what we were going to do. He uncovered a Delta jig saw and mentioned he had used it for years at Auerbach’s to make displays. I was so excited and can remember my Dad and I carrying it out to the car. Forty-three years later, I am still enjoying that jig saw and have made many projects including pine wood derby cars for each of my sons during their Cub Scout years.

Grandma and Grandpa were supportive to attend special functions and made me feel important. While on my mission, Grandma Ruth wrote letters on a regular basis. She always sealed the back of the envelope with a lipstick kiss on the envelope. I can remember my missionary companions teasing me that I had a letter from my girl friend!

Grandma Ruth was good to call and to keep in touch and to ask about what I was doing. She was a good listener and made me feel important as she asked questions to let me know she was really interested in what I was doing. Grandma Ruth and Grandpa Fred were the only grandparents I knew, and I especially love them for being good and loving parents to my Dad.

Written by John (Jack) Allen White (grandson) on March 15, 2006



Memories of Grandpa Fred and Grandma Ruth


Even at my age of 66, I can still recall fond memories of Grandpa Fred White and Grandma Ruth Glass White. What a devoted and handsome couple they made. Grandpa was always in his suit, tie and hat, and Grandma was always in her lovely dress, gloves and a fetching hat to match. One might have called them 'Mutt and Jeff'. Grandma Ruth was considerably taller than Grandpa Fred. Their difference in height didn't seem to matter to them as they walked lovingly together on daily walks from their apartment to the downtown area.

I remember spending much time in the different apartments they lived in. Grandma Ruth was a wonderful cook, and always displayed a lovely setted table to go with her robust and tasty meals. Each time just before we sat down to eat, Grandpa Fred would tell us, with a big grin on his face, how hard he had worked to prepare the meal and set the table. Grandma Ruth would step in with, "Oh Fred, you know you didn't do all the work for this dinner"! Grandpa Fred never seemed to tire of teasing Grandma.

Grandpa Fred was the family master at regular checkers and Chinese checkers. We grandchildren all tried to beat him at these games, but to my knowledge, none of us could best him, much less even win one game from him. Grandpa was a commercial artist, and I enjoyed watching him draw figures for us. As a young child and even into my adult life, I remember Grandpa Fred reaching into his pant pockets and drawing out money (change) which he lovingly placed into my hands. At one time, he smoked a pipe. I can still almost smell the sweet smell of the tobacco coming from his pipe. To remember him as my only grandpa and as a fun, loving, sweet, and caring man is a treasured legacy!

Grandma Ruth always had a singing canary or a parakeet in her dining room. I remember the beautiful trills from the canaries, and the happy chirps from the parakeets. She had a parakeet until the last few years of her life. The two apartments I remember being in radiated warmth, good food and love of family. My cousin Roger Thomsen and I spent many happy and fun hours together looking at our grandparents' National Geographic magazines. I recall us sitting in comfortable overstuffed chairs, laughing and enjoying being together as cousins while the adults visited in another room.

Grandma Ruth continually expressed her love and pride not only for her grandchildren, but also for her great-grandchildren. She seemed to have a special concern for her deaf great grandson, Dan Mathis. I think she felt this way because her own son, my father, John F. White was also deaf. She worried about the challenges that might come to him, and wanted Dan to have the best education and life possible.

When Claudia Thomsen (Roger's wife) and I were expecting our first child within a few months of each other, she gave us both beautiful pink matching baby blankets. She couldn't wait for her first great-grandchildren to come, nor could she wait for us to open her gifts of the blankets. Grandma Ruth asked us to open the gifts even before the babies were born. How she knew we would both have girls is beyond me. This of course was in the 'olden days' before ultrasounds. Grandma always wore magenta colored lipstick. She sent notes and birthday cards to the family and sealed them with a 'magenta kiss' on the paper.

I have sad memories of Grandma Ruth in her later years of life. She struggled to care for our bedridden grandfather at a time when nursing help was not as available as it is now. She took such good care of him! When her own health and strength failed, she had to live in nursing homes. It was an unhappy life for her to be away from her apartment, and the lovely things she and grandpa had bought during their lifetime of hard work. She also felt torn from her family and the opportunities to do the things she loved to do. Even in the final year of her life, she would sadly and lovingly show me a framed painted portrait of her mother and her natural father, Samuel Glass. Grandma Ruth also left me a legacy to remember; her natural beauty, smile, and her love for the family!

Written by Carol Ann White Mathis (granddaughter)


My fond memories of long ago...

Visits with grandpa Fred and grandma Ruth were laced with special memories. They started with a drive in one of dad's most beloved cars, down memorable streets, to a special apartment building in downtown Salt Lake. The apartment building had beautiful gates, through which one would walk and soon enter a beautiful courtyard with gardens and an exquisite water fountain. The fountain was a beautiful maiden with long flowing hair. A fountain so loved and adored by grandma and grandpa. One would always look up to the top level to see their apartment and see if they were looking out and waving. Once inside the apartment building, it was a long trek up the stairs. Often the stairway was filled with the aromas of grandma's most wonderful cooking. Once at the door, one was always greeted with a hug and a kiss with lots of lipstick. Grandpa would be in his favorite chair and smile at you with his mischievous grin, and ask for a hug. One would put their coat on the bed in the bedroom that was filled with antiques, ornate perfume bottles, numerous splendid hats, and many fancy hat boxes.

It was always a treat to have one of grandma's most excellent home cooked meals. She also had a way with sweet rolls buttered and broiled just right. She kept her apartment clean, tidy, and beautifully decorated. She always made you feel welcome and fed you well. She always gave me beautiful cards and hankies perfumed with violets.

Grandpa always teased grandma. He, with such a look of mischief on his face; and she, with such a look of half disgust and half loving pleasure. He doted on her and always watched her. She was his beautiful love. He loving referred to her as Diamond Lil. She always looked just beautiful in her lovely dresses, fancy hats, gloves, and lots of JEWELRY. Her hair, makeup and lipstick (purple) were always done up just right. Grandpa was always so proud of her and treated her with such respect and love. Grandma always waited on him, cooked well for him, and loved him back. Whenever we took them home, they always gave you a big hug and kiss goodbye. Grandpa would always give me some peanuts when he said goodbye. If he did not have peanuts, he gave me some coins to buy peanuts. I saved all those coins. They were so special because he gave them to me with such love and sweetness. I hope he is not upset I did not buy peanuts...

They both set an example of love and respect for each other. They always kept smiling, through good and not so good times. They were always such a joy to be with.

God speed the day our journeys cross again. We shall share hugs and kisses, and stories of life. I can show grandpa his coins. Until then, God speed and bless them both.

Amen. Sherri White Berntsen

Fred’s Green Card Fred’s Green Card

Fred’s Green Card
Ruth Glass in 1893 in Salt Lake City
Ruth Glass in 1893 in Salt Lake City
Ruth Glass in about 1903 with her aunt, Laura Glass Heisler
Ruth Glass in about 1903 with her aunt, Laura Glass Heisler
Fred as a boy
Fred as a boy
Ruth, Jack, and Fred White in 1912
Ruth, Jack, and Fred White in 1912
Cohn’s Department Store is where Fred and Ruth worked and met in 1907. The picture is from 1914.
Cohn’s Department Store is where Fred and Ruth worked and met in 1907. The picture is from 1914.
Auerbach’s in the 1940’s, where Fred worked.
Auerbach’s in the 1940’s, where Fred worked.
Ruth and Jack fishing
Ruth and Jack fishing
Jack, Ruth and Fred in the backseat with their friends the Bakers in the front seat going to Yellowstone in about 1917
Jack, Ruth and Fred in the backseat with their friends the Bakers in the front seat going to Yellowstone in about 1917
In about 1923, Jack, Ruth, Marjorie
In about 1923, Jack, Ruth, Marjorie
Fred, Sarah, Jack, Grace & Ruth on front porch
Fred, Sarah, Jack, Grace and Ruth on front porch
Auerbach’s store window in 1908, Fred started working for Auerbach’s in 1910 and was responsible for window displays.
Auerbach’s store window in 1908, Fred started working for Auerbach’s in 1910 and was responsible for window displays.
Fred with three cigars in pocket
Fred with three cigars in pocket
In about 1930, Marjorie, Eliza, and Ruth
In about 1930, Marjorie, Eliza, and Ruth
Ruth in 1943
Ruth in 1943
Fred in about 1940
Fred in about 1940
Ruth in about 1962
Ruth in about 1962
Fred’s signature from Will in 1956
Fred’s signature from Will in 1956
Ruth’s signature from Social Security Health Insurance card in 1966
Ruth’s signature from Social Security Health Insurance card in 1966
Golden Wedding Anniversary in 1959 at Marjorie White Thomsen’s living room
Golden Wedding Anniversary in 1959 at Marjorie White Thomsen’s living room
Fred and Ruth lived from 1952 to 1977 on the top floor of the Elaine Apartments, located at approximately 450 East on 300 South.  The arrow indicates the location of their apartment.
Fred and Ruth lived from 1952 to 1977 on the top floor of the Elaine Apartments, located at approximately 450 East on 300 South. The arrow indicates the location of their apartment.
In front of the home of Sarah, Florence and Cicely White in 1947
In front of the home of Sarah, Florence and Cicely White in 1947
Right to left: Vida White (Jack’s wife), Florence and Cicely (Fred’s sisters), Ruth White, Marjorie White Thomsen, Jack White, and Fred White
Ruth and Fred’s living room in 1965, with dining room behind and bedroom to right
Ruth and Fred’s living room in 1965, with dining room behind and bedroom to right Left to Right: Jack White, Fred, Ruth, Vida White, and Sherri White (Jack’s daughter)
The Great-grandchildren on Ruth’s couch in 1965
The Great-grandchildren on Ruth’s couch in 1965
Left to right: Michael Thomsen, Ruth, Helena Thomsen, Catherine Thomsen (the first great-grandchild, and Fred. Michael and Catherine are the children of Roger and Claudia Thomsen
Left to right: Helena Thomsen, Catherine Thomsen, Michael Thomsen, Grace White Cracroft, Florence White, Fred, Jack White and Ruth
Left to right: Helena Thomsen, Catherine Thomsen, Michael Thomsen, Grace White Cracroft, Florence White, Fred, Jack White and Ruth