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John Samuel Holton and Ann Scroxton – Fred White’s Grandparents

John Samuel Holton was born June 11, 1822, in Northampton, England. He was a jovial and common sensed man. He was good looking, had black hair which retained its color to the last, and had a full set of good teeth upon his death at age 63. He died before the missionaries converted his family to the LDS Church. He died from asthma on June 13, 1885, in Northampton.

Ann Scroxton was born June 11, 1825, in Podington, Bedsford, England. She was gentle, quite, and peace loving. She died on March 28, 1904, at the home of her son, Fred J. Holton, and was buried in Brigham City cemetery.

John and Ann were married probably before 1843; however, the exact date is not know. Their ten children were all born in Northampton, England. There first child was Sarah who was born on October 14, 1843, and who died on October 20, 1843, living only six days. Henry was born on July 7, 1845, and died on July 12, 1845, living only five days. Edward Eusebius was born on Jan 27, 1847, and died on November 13, 1849, living two years and ten months. Louisa Ann was born on Feb 2, 1850, and died on April 13, 1856, living six years two months. Hannah Wilson was born on May 20, 1852, and died in Brigham City, Utah on July 19, 1922. Jane Elizabeth was born on November 4, 1854, and died on September 3, 1857, living two years ten months. Sarah Ann, our great grandmother, was born on July 3, 1857, and was the second child to live into adulthood. Cicely Louisa was born on November 27, 1859, and died on September 29, 1863, living three years ten months. Frederick John Holland was born on March 17, 1864, was a judge in Brigham City, and died August 6, 1958, in Orem, Utah and was buried in Brigham City. John Samuel was born on January 13, 1867, and died on June 10, 1943, when a car ran him over in front of his grocery store in Perry, Utah. Six children died in Northampton; this deeply saddened Ann. The four children that lived to adulthood were converted to the LDS Church and died in Utah.

The family lived in a brown stone cottage, two stories high at No. 22 George Street. The home was surrounded on the east by a court yard planted with lawn and trees. This court yard was the entrance to a big shoe factory owned by a man named Clark. The premises were very beautiful and ran east and west. The west was bordered by the Nene River. It was here that Sarah Ann Holton was born. Later, the family moved to No. 2 Fitzroy Street.

The family were active members of the Church of England, St Peter’s and St. Katherine’s Parish. Fred J Holton wrote, “To reach our chapel we would go to the top of George Street, then go to Regent Square, beginning of Sheep Street (up on street and south) about half a mile to St. Sepulcher, a gothic structure with a large steeple, one great spire, and eight bells in the steeple. They were very skilled in playing tunes. The edifice was larger than our chapels. The stone work was cut into beautiful flowers; where the choir sat it was carved oak; the pews and pulpit were carved. The pastor was Reverend William Butlin; his assistant was Reverend Thornton. Later, we lived near St. Peter’s Church, presided over by Reverend Tom. The family was very fond of their various ministers, especially Reverend Tom. The Reverend S. J. Sanders had charge of the grammar school; he was an ordained Church of England Minister. He used to preach at other parishes on request. If Sarah knew he was going to preach elsewhere, she would follow him.”

The home conditions of the family were pleasant and industrious, and the children were brought up in great love and devotion to their God and to their family. There was a sincere, deep spiritual atmosphere within the circle and great respect was taught for the Sabbath Day. The children attended regularly Bible classes, Sunday School, and other services and were taught to memorize passages of Holy Scripture. Family prayer was observed. Sunday was considered a day of worship and rest. Economic conditions in the home were observed. The children were taught not to waste anything that could be made usable.

Northampton was a shoe manufacturing town and at that time supplied Russia with shoes for her army. John was an industrious shoemaker. He could complete a shoe from beginning to end, by hand, no machinery. Some of the people got the leather from the factory and made the shoes in their own homes. Children, in those days, worked at a very tender age, depending on private schools for further education.

At the age of fourteen, Sarah Holton went to work in a shoe factory. John trained her to do very precise, neat and careful work.

Written by Florence White

John Samuel Holton
John Samuel Holton
Ann Scroxton
Ann Scroxton
Jane Scroxton, Ann’s Sister (mentioned in Sarah Ann Scroxton’s history)
Jane Scroxton, Ann’s Sister (mentioned in Sarah Ann Scroxton’s history)